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Wednesday, May 19, 2010

Quiet Book Pages, Love Letters




As Promised Here are some pictures from Danny's Quiet book. I love these pages for the mailbox. Danny's grandmother thought that it would be fun to have a page where Danny could learn to make sentences like "I love Mami". I thought that the mailbox would be the perfect pocket for all of those love letters to mom.



One of the great things about quiet books or activity books is that you are able to keep your kids busy, but also allow them to learn new things and develop new skills. This particular page allows for development of sentence structuring skills, and also the development of motor skills as children open and close the mailbox, rotate the mailbox flag, and pull and place the velcro attached envelopes.


I think that it is so much fun to personalize the pages. This particular mailbox is personalized with a last name stitched on the mailbox, and with personalized envelopes. So now Danny can make sentences like: "I love Mami", "Daddy loves Danny", "I love Abuelita", ect.


Quiet books are fun to make because you are ultimately in control of how much detail you put in. I personally like a fair amount of detail, but I try not to go overboard. The stamps for example are there, but I didn't make a full scene or image on each stamp (which I considered doing). I think that the small block of color is sufficient for the project. I prefer stitching letters on the page with embroidery floss rather than using paint pens. I just think that it compliments the materials better. Quiet books also take a great deal of time and work. I want the book to last a long time, and I also want to be satisfied when I am looking at it. In my opinion there is nothing worse than staring at something you made and wishing that you had done things differently.

A few tips if you decide that you want to try this project:
  • Use the soft side of the velcro on the backs of the envelopes so that it doesn't stick to the inside of the mailbox and pull on the felt.
  • Use two layers of felt instead of one in the areas that will be handled most (flag, mailbox shell, mailbox flap, and also the envelopes).
  • Stitch details such as names or stamps onto 1 layer of felt and encase the strings and ends with the second layer of felt.

1 comment:

Tish said...

I know this post is over a year old, but I have to tell you how much I love this particular page. I'm just planning my first quiet book, and have seen many mailbox pages in my search for inspiration and assistance (I'm a rudimentary sewer at best!). Your's is hands down the best. I love that the letters make sentences. I'm going to attempt a similar design myself. Hope you adhere to the copying is the sincerest form of flattery philosophy.